SCIENCE

Meowgical Science Behind Your Cat’s Coat

Cats come in a highly diverse variety of coat patterns, colorations and textures. Many different genes are involved in creating just how unique your purrfect companion will turn out to be. Have you ever wondered about the role of genetics in your cat’s captivating looks? To get you started on the long journey of feline genetics, we prepared a short guide through the genetics of the feline coat for you. Read up!

2019-09-08T20:10:14+00:00COAT CARE, GENETICS, SCIENCE|

Behind the Scenes at Basepaws

You’ve purchased a CatKit, collected some of your cat’s DNA and shipped it back to us. Exciting stuff! Wait, but what happens next? The time has come for us to unravel a little bit about our recipe to unfolding your feline’s DNA secrets. No, not everything - there is still a lot we don’t know ourselves, and every sample helps get us closer. But we want to tell you a bit about us, inside and out. Let’s take a quick look behind the curtains and see what really happens once your sample reaches the Basepaws Labs!

New Basepaws Research Initiative!

On our journey towards a better future for all cats, we are leading novel discoveries and advances in the field of feline science and genetics. As we continue to grasp new knowledge and information, we drive the focus on research initiatives which can help improve the understanding of feline biology and improve the health management of cats everywhere. Today, we are thrilled to announce our new research initiative - the Basepaws Feline Diabetes Mellitus (DM) Research Project!

A Time of Feline Genetics Discovery: Interview with Anna Skaya CEO & Founder Basepaws

Have you ever looked at your cat and wondered about its origins, lineage and history? With most of our cats, we have no clue about their genetic origins, which is changing fast. You can now find out more about your cat's genetic heritage with a simple test that requires nothing more than a few of kitty's hairs! The founder & CEO of Basepaws, Anna Skaya, recently gave an interview to TheCatSite. Built from scratch, Anna reveals how Basepaws came to be, the mission of the company and how is important to promote scientific research into cat health.

2019-04-25T12:31:47+00:00BASEPAWS SCIENCE, FAQ, SCIENCE|

Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) – A Viral Disease Explained

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a rare and progressive disease caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). Most strains of this virus are avirulent, meaning they don't actually cause the disease. These strains are marked as feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). In 5-10% of infected cats, however, the infection will progress into clinical FIP. This virus is then referred to as feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). Once clinical FIP develops, it almost always has a fatal destiny.

2019-04-08T16:57:34+00:00CARE, HEALTH, SCIENCE|

Feline Cancer – Background, Science and Answers (part 1)

According to Animal Cancer Foundation, 1 in 5 cats will develop cancer in their lifetime. Cancer in cats is actually less common than cancer in dogs, but once it is diagnosed, it tends to move faster. Knowledge is power, and our role as pet parents is to be armed with information and provide our companions with the best possible care. Yet, how much do we really know about this deadly disease in cats? It's time to talk science!

2019-03-16T12:15:12+00:00CANCER, GENETICS, HEALTH, SCIENCE|

Hemingway Cats

Please note that you're reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

Polydactylism is one of the traits both humans and cats have. Actually, mice, dogs and even horses also have extra toes (or small supernumerary digits terminating in hooves either side of the main hoof). Alexander the Great and Caesar both rode polydactyl horses.

Cancer in cats. Part one.

Please note that you are reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

According to Animal Cancer Foundation, 1 in 5 cats will develop cancer in their lifetime. Cancer in cats is actually less common than cancer in dogs, but once it is diagnosed, it tends to move faster. Since cats are the closest mammals to humans (outside of primates, of course) it is no wonder cats share many of the same cancers with us. Knowledge is power, and how much do we really know about signs of this deadly disease in feline?

2019-03-07T04:14:21+00:00CANCER, GENETICS, HEALTH, SCIENCE|