Filter by: HEALTH INDEX


What is Feline Hyperlipoproteinemia? What is Feline Hyperlipoproteinemia?
Basepaws
05/21/2019

Hyperlipoproteinemia is a disease in which the body is unable to properly break down lipids and lipoproteins, mainly cholesterol and triglycerides. As a result, their levels are continually elevated in the blood which poses a serious health threat. Hyperlipoproteinemia can be primary (genetic) or secondary (idiopathic) and it has been associated with increased risk from heart disease.

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Basepaws + Catstradamus: Together in the Fight Against HCM Basepaws + Catstradamus: Together in the Fight Against HCM
Basepaws
04/20/2019

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common feline heart disease -- up to 15% of all cats may suffer from it (Payne et al, 2015). This disease affects the cat's myocardium and causes thickening of the heart’s left ventricle. Many cats with HCM can live long and healthy lives, however, for some cats, HCM can be a devastating and lethal disease. Maine Coons and Ragdolls are thought to be at a higher risk from HCM. We have recently lost an office cat to this cruel disease, so we have been extra-focused on adding this marker to our health report.

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Gangliosidosis in Cats: Genetic Disease Explained Gangliosidosis in Cats: Genetic Disease Explained
Basepaws
03/14/2019

Gangliosidosis is a group of lipid storage disorders characterized by the accumulation of lipids – gangliosides in neurons. The disease was identified both in humans and cats. Human gangliosidosis is classified into two types, GM1 and GM2. The second type is further classified into three subtypes: GM2A (Tay-Sachs disease), GM2AB (AB variant) and GM2B (Sandhoff disease or 0 variant). All of the variants of the human disease have been identified in cats except for the Tay-Sachs (GM2A).

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My Cat Has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean? My Cat Has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean?
Basepaws
02/21/2019

Has your cat been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease? You are not alone. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in cats. It is widely described in Persian and related cats, but also, sporadically, in other cat breeds (Nivy et al, 2015 & Volta et al, 2009). PKD is diagnosed in approximately 38% of Persian cats worldwide, which accounts for about 6% of all cats (Lyons et al, 2014). The disease is characterized by a formation of small fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure. An autosomal dominant mutation in the PKD1 gene has been identified as a cause for this condition.

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Oh no! My Cat Was Diagnosed With Cystinuria! What Do I Need to Know? Oh no! My Cat Was Diagnosed With Cystinuria! What Do I Need to Know?
Basepaws
01/29/2019

Cystinuria is an inherited metabolic disease that is relatively common in dogs, but rare in cats (Mizukami, 2016). The condition is characterized by defective amino acid reabsorption, leading to the formation of cystine stones in the kidney, ureter and the bladder (cystine urolithiasis). This can lead to urinary obstruction. In cats, only two cystinuria types have been identified so far: I-A and II-B (Mizukami et al, 2015 & Mizukami et al, 2016).

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A Short Guide Through The Chronic Kidney Disease In Cats A Short Guide Through The Chronic Kidney Disease In Cats
Basepaws
01/22/2019

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a renal disease associated with a gradual loss of kidney function over a period of several months or years. Unlike acute renal disease, which develops suddenly and progresses rapidly, CKD progresses slowly and persistently, often with no apparent symptoms until later stages. CKD is also known under terms chronic renal disease (CRD), chronic renal failure (CRF) and chronic renal insufficiency.

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Knowing Your Cat’s Blood Type Could Save Its Life Knowing Your Cat’s Blood Type Could Save Its Life
Basepaws
01/18/2019

Just like us humans, our purrfect companions also have different blood groups. Do you already know what know your kitty's blood type is? Knowing your cat’s blood group can be vital in different situations, yet, unless it's an emergency, this doesn't come up often. To keep you on top of your game, here is everything you need to know about different blood groups in cats and why you really should know your letters!

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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Feline Genetic Heart Disease Explained Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Feline Genetic Heart Disease Explained
Basepaws
01/10/2019

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common feline heart disease, and up to 15% of all cats may suffer from it (Payne et al, 2015). This genetic disease affects your cat's myocardium and causes thickening of the left ventricle of the heart (left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction). This decreases the blood flow through the ventricle and increases heart rate (tachycardia). Many cats with HCM can live long and healthy lives, however, for some cats, HCM can be a devastating disease. Maine Coons and Ragdolls are thought to be at a higher risk from this genetic disease.

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Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome: What Do I Need To Know? Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome: What Do I Need To Know?
Basepaws
01/08/2019

Congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by defects at the neuromuscular junction. In cats, this condition is associated with a deficiency of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The deficiency of the enzyme is caused by a truncation of the collagen-like tail subunit of acetylcholinesterase (COLQ). The deficiency of the signal transduction termination leads to prolonged muscle contraction and muscle stiffness (spasticity) which interferes with normal movement. The disease seems to be associated with Devon Rex and Sphynx cats.

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Brachycephaly In Cats Brachycephaly In Cats
Basepaws
12/06/2018

Brachycephaly is a trait of skull bones shortened in length, giving the face and nose of a cat a "pushed in" appearance. Due to shorter bones of the face and nose, the anatomy of the face is altered. This can potentially cause various physical problems, such as breathing difficulties. A condition that is related to this abnormality is brachycephaly airway syndrome. This is a set of airway abnormalities in cats (and dogs) which may involve stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, hypoplastic trachea and everted laryngeal saccules. Typical brachycephalic cat breeds are Persian, Himalayan and Burmese cats.

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Factor XII deficiency in cats Factor XII deficiency in cats
Basepaws
05/01/2018

Factor XII deficiency, also known as Hageman deficiency, is the most common congenital coagulopathy among cats. Although common among bleeding disorders, this condition is actually often asymptomatic. Hageman trait is a blood clotting disorder characterized by deficiency in the coagulation factor XII. For more background information about blood coagulation as well as other hemophilia disorders, please read our blog Hemophilia in cats.

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Hemophilia in cats Hemophilia in cats
Basepaws
04/03/2018

Hemophilia is a group or rare hereditary bleeding disorders in which the cat’s blood doesn’t clot appropriately in case of an injury. Although uncommon, hemophilia is a severe condition that can be inborn or acquired. Today we aim to explain to you what happens when bleeding in cats occurs, how bleeding disorders develop and what hemophilia actually is.

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Why Can Knowing Your Cat’s Blood Type Save It’s Life? Why Can Knowing Your Cat’s Blood Type Save It’s Life?
Basepaws
03/26/2018

Please not that you're reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

Just like us humans, our favorite pets also have different blood groups. Do you already know what know your feline’s is? Knowing your cat’s blood group can be vital in certain situations, yet rarely does this come up, unless it’s an emergency. Today we will tell you everything you need to know about different blood groups in cats and why you should know your letters!

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My Cat has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean? My Cat has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean?
Basepaws
08/04/2017

Please note that you are reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

Has your cat been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease? You are not alone. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) affects up to 6% of all cats. Many cats with PKD will live long, happy lives despite having cysts in their kidneys. Unfortunately, some cats develop more or larger cysts than other PKD cats, and this can lead to chronic renal disease and kidney failure. It’s best to identify and treat this feline disease as soon as possible.

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Help! My Cat was Diagnosed with Hyptertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Genetic Heart Disease Explained Help! My Cat was Diagnosed with Hyptertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Genetic Heart Disease Explained
Basepaws
06/22/2017

Please note that you are reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

Has your cat been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? Don’t panic. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common feline heart disease, and up to 15% of all cats may suffer from it. In fact, many cats with HCM will live long and healthy lives without ever being diagnosed or treated. However, for some cats, HCM can become a devastating disease.

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