GENETIC DISEASE

Hypokalemic Periodic Polymyopathy

Hypokalemia refers to athe state of low potassium ion (K+) levels in the blood. It's often a secondary problem caused by other deficiencies or diseases, but it may also be a result of a primary congenital disease, such as hypokalemic period polymyopathy. Hypokalemic polymyopathy is a genetic disease of the Burmese and closely related cats. The condition is marked by either generalized or localized skeletal muscle weakness, often episodic in nature.

Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (Type I)

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is an immunodeficiency disorder associated with recurrent infections. This genetic disorder has been described in humans, cats, dogs and cattle. Human LAD is classified into three types (LAD-1 to -3), of which type 1 most closely resembles LAD in cats. Feline LAD is a very difficult condition and, if left untreated, it can be lethal for affected kittens. Genetic tests could help recognize any predisposition to the disease and prevent its succession through generations.

What is Feline Hyperlipoproteinemia?

Hyperlipoproteinemia is a disease in which the body is unable to properly break down lipids and lipoproteins, mainly cholesterol and triglycerides. As a result, their levels are continually elevated in the blood which poses a serious health threat. Hyperlipoproteinemia can be primary (genetic) or secondary (idiopathic) and it has been associated with increased risk from heart disease.

Gangliosidosis in Cats: Genetic Disease Explained

Gangliosidosis is a group of lipid storage disorders characterized by the accumulation of lipids – gangliosides in neurons. The disease was identified both in humans and cats. Human gangliosidosis is classified into two types, GM1 and GM2. The second type is further classified into three subtypes: GM2A (Tay-Sachs disease), GM2AB (AB variant) and GM2B (Sandhoff disease or 0 variant). All of the variants of the human disease have been identified in cats except for the Tay-Sachs (GM2A).

Hemophilia in cats

Hemophilia is a group or rare hereditary bleeding disorders in which the cat’s blood doesn’t clot appropriately in case of an injury. Although uncommon, hemophilia is a severe condition that can be inborn or acquired. Today we aim to explain to you what happens when bleeding in cats occurs, how bleeding disorders develop and what hemophilia actually is.

Factor XII deficiency in cats

Factor XII deficiency, also known as Hageman deficiency, is the most common congenital coagulopathy among cats. Although common among bleeding disorders, this condition is actually often asymptomatic. Hageman trait is a blood clotting disorder characterized by deficiency in the coagulation factor XII. For more background information about blood coagulation as well as other hemophilia disorders, please read our blog Hemophilia in cats.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

Wonderfully distinct from all the other animals, cats never fail to impress. From mesmerizing eye colours and charming ‘squints’ to extraordinarily powerful and precise vision, feline eyes are truly a wonder of nature. Unfortunately, sometimes, cats can suffer from certain complications which can affect their vision and overall health status. One of the more severe disorders of this kind is a group of retinal diseases known as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA).

Feline Myotonia Congenita

Myotonia Congenita (MC) is a hereditary neuromuscular disorder characterized by persistent contraction (or delayed relaxation of muscles), particularly during the muscle movement. The word myotonia derives from the Greek word "myo" for muscle and Latin word "tonus" for tension. This disease is caused by an autosomal recessive point mutation and it is not breed-specific. Other than cats, the disease has been described in humans, dogs, horses, goats, mice and water buffalos too.