Filter by: GENETIC DISEASE


Gangliosidosis in Cats: Genetic Disease Explained Gangliosidosis in Cats: Genetic Disease Explained
Basepaws
03/14/2019

Gangliosidosis is a group of lipid storage disorders characterized by the accumulation of lipids – gangliosides in neurons. The disease was identified both in humans and cats. Human gangliosidosis is classified into two types, GM1 and GM2. The second type is further classified into three subtypes: GM2A (Tay-Sachs disease), GM2AB (AB variant) and GM2B (Sandhoff disease or 0 variant). All of the variants of the human disease have been identified in cats except for the Tay-Sachs (GM2A).

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My Cat Has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean? My Cat Has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean?
Basepaws
02/21/2019

Has your cat been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease? You are not alone. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in cats. It is widely described in Persian and related cats, but also, sporadically, in other cat breeds (Nivy et al, 2015 & Volta et al, 2009). PKD is diagnosed in approximately 38% of Persian cats worldwide, which accounts for about 6% of all cats (Lyons et al, 2014). The disease is characterized by a formation of small fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure. An autosomal dominant mutation in the PKD1 gene has been identified as a cause for this condition.

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Oh no! My Cat Was Diagnosed With Cystinuria! What Do I Need to Know? Oh no! My Cat Was Diagnosed With Cystinuria! What Do I Need to Know?
Basepaws
01/29/2019

Cystinuria is an inherited metabolic disease that is relatively common in dogs, but rare in cats (Mizukami, 2016). The condition is characterized by defective amino acid reabsorption, leading to the formation of cystine stones in the kidney, ureter and the bladder (cystine urolithiasis). This can lead to urinary obstruction. In cats, only two cystinuria types have been identified so far: I-A and II-B (Mizukami et al, 2015 & Mizukami et al, 2016).

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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Feline Genetic Heart Disease Explained Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Feline Genetic Heart Disease Explained
Basepaws
01/10/2019

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common feline heart disease, and up to 15% of all cats may suffer from it (Payne et al, 2015). This genetic disease affects your cat's myocardium and causes thickening of the left ventricle of the heart (left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction). This decreases the blood flow through the ventricle and increases heart rate (tachycardia). Many cats with HCM can live long and healthy lives, however, for some cats, HCM can be a devastating disease. Maine Coons and Ragdolls are thought to be at a higher risk from this genetic disease.

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Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome: What Do I Need To Know? Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome: What Do I Need To Know?
Basepaws
01/08/2019

Congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by defects at the neuromuscular junction. In cats, this condition is associated with a deficiency of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The deficiency of the enzyme is caused by a truncation of the collagen-like tail subunit of acetylcholinesterase (COLQ). The deficiency of the signal transduction termination leads to prolonged muscle contraction and muscle stiffness (spasticity) which interferes with normal movement. The disease seems to be associated with Devon Rex and Sphynx cats.

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Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)
Basepaws
11/14/2018

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (abbr. ALPS) is a lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) distinguished by massive enlargement of lymphatic nodes and spleen caused by the accumulation of lymphocytes. The disease is caused by irregular lymphocyte apoptosis. This is a lethal genetic condition that has, for now, only been identified in British Shorthair cats. Kittens suffering from ALPS show signs around the age of 6-8 weeks and die or are euthanized shortly after (Aberdein et al, 2017). The disease shows similarities to the human disorder autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), also known as the Canale-Smith syndrome.

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Feline Urticaria Pigmentosa Feline Urticaria Pigmentosa
Basepaws
10/16/2018

Urticaria pigmentosa is a form of a condition known as cutaneous mastocytosis and it is caused by the accumulation of the defective mast cells (a type of white blood cells) in the skin, bone marrow, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. This skin condition is poorly documented and it is better described in humans and Sphynx and Devon Rex cat breeds. A study about five affected Devon Rex cats (Nolie et al, 2009) emphasizes that naked feline breeds are predisposed to this condition.

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Feline Myotonia Congenita Feline Myotonia Congenita
Basepaws
09/21/2018

Myotonia Congenita (MC) is a hereditary neuromuscular disorder characterized by persistent contraction (or delayed relaxation of muscles), particularly during the muscle movement. The word myotonia derives from the Greek word "myo" for muscle and Latin word "tonus" for tension. This disease is caused by an autosomal recessive point mutation and it is not breed-specific. Other than cats, the disease has been described in humans, dogs, horses, goats, mice and water buffalos too.

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Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Basepaws
08/10/2018

Wonderfully distinct from all the other animals, cats never fail to impress. From mesmerizing eye colours and charming ‘squints’ to extraordinarily powerful and precise vision, feline eyes are truly a wonder of nature. Unfortunately, sometimes, cats can suffer from certain complications which can affect their vision and overall health status. One of the more severe disorders of this kind is a group of retinal diseases known as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA).

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Factor XII deficiency in cats Factor XII deficiency in cats
Basepaws
05/01/2018

Factor XII deficiency, also known as Hageman deficiency, is the most common congenital coagulopathy among cats. Although common among bleeding disorders, this condition is actually often asymptomatic. Hageman trait is a blood clotting disorder characterized by deficiency in the coagulation factor XII. For more background information about blood coagulation as well as other hemophilia disorders, please read our blog Hemophilia in cats.

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Hemophilia in cats Hemophilia in cats
Basepaws
04/03/2018

Hemophilia is a group or rare hereditary bleeding disorders in which the cat’s blood doesn’t clot appropriately in case of an injury. Although uncommon, hemophilia is a severe condition that can be inborn or acquired. Today we aim to explain to you what happens when bleeding in cats occurs, how bleeding disorders develop and what hemophilia actually is.

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My Cat has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean? My Cat has Polycystic Kidney Disease: What Does This Mean?
Basepaws
08/04/2017

Please note that you are reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

Has your cat been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease? You are not alone. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) affects up to 6% of all cats. Many cats with PKD will live long, happy lives despite having cysts in their kidneys. Unfortunately, some cats develop more or larger cysts than other PKD cats, and this can lead to chronic renal disease and kidney failure. It’s best to identify and treat this feline disease as soon as possible.

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Help! My Cat was Diagnosed with Hyptertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Genetic Heart Disease Explained Help! My Cat was Diagnosed with Hyptertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Genetic Heart Disease Explained
Basepaws
06/22/2017

Please note that you are reading the old version of this article. You can find the updated article here.

Has your cat been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? Don’t panic. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common feline heart disease, and up to 15% of all cats may suffer from it. In fact, many cats with HCM will live long and healthy lives without ever being diagnosed or treated. However, for some cats, HCM can become a devastating disease.

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